The New Antioxidant Powerhouse: CoffeeBerry Extract

The Coffea arabica coffee cherry

CoffeeBerry extract is the new antioxidant in town. Derived from the coffee cherry of the Coffea arabica when it is still green and “sub-ripe”, CoffeeBerry Extract contains an extremely high concentration of polyphenols, particularly chlorogenic acid, which serve as potent antioxidants (Baumann). In fact, according to Allure magazine, CoffeeBerry Extract currently has the highest antioxidant potential of any ingredient, based on its Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity Score (ORAC) — a method developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture as the standard to measure the antioxidant capacity of natural substances. In plain terms, this means CoffeeBerry is a better antioxidant than green tea, white tea, vitamin C, vitamin E, grape seed extract or idebenone. In fact, CoffeeBerry Extract has ten times the antioxidant power of green tea (Baumann). However, no studies to date have compared the effect of CoffeeBerry alone to combinations of other antioxidants, which may act synergistically to sustain their levels in the skin.

Antioxidants are important components in the fight against aging. Without antioxidants, factors like sun exposure and pollution cause the skin to release free radicals, which (amongst other things) destroy collagen, one of the proteins that keeps skin looking plump, lifted, and unwrinkled. The body naturally produces antioxidants or acquires them from one’s diet or a supplement. However, antioxidant levels may be increased in the skin via topical application. As such, antioxidants are excellent prevention against future signs of aging.
 

Yet, the effects of CoffeeBerry are more than just preventative. According to results published in Allure magazine, the texture and tone of the skin treated with CoffeeBerry extract showed 46 per cent improvement in fine lines and wrinkles, 64 per cent in overall skin smoothness, and 79 per cent in skin hydration. CoffeeBerry may be so effective partially because of its mechanism of action in the cell. Unlike other antioxidants, CoffeeBerry combats free radicals throughout the entire skin cell, unlike many other antioxidants, which are limited to specific areas of the cell. Further, CoffeeBerry contains exfoliating polyhydroxy acids, which help the user see almost immediate improvement. Studies additionally confirm that the ingredient is safe and effective for dry skin and skin discoloration.

My personal advice? If you are not using a form of antioxidant protection, or if you are using a moisturizer with a single antioxidant, then switch to Revalé Skin’s CoffeeBerry, available here. However, if you are already using a form of antioxidant protection with three or more antioxidants fairly high in the ingredients list, then I would personally let RevaléSkin sit on the shelf, at least until research comes out comparing CoffeeBerry to a combination of antioxidants.

Overall, however, a great product. 9.5/10, only missing the 0.5 because it lacks other antioxidant ingredients. For more on antioxidants, please visit here.

by Nicki Zevola

5 thoughts on “The New Antioxidant Powerhouse: CoffeeBerry Extract

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  5. Denise says:

    Hi Nicki, thanks for the nice intro to coffeeberry! I was wondering, what is you opinion on taking antioxidants like vitamin C/E and coffee berry as supplement and how that compares to appying the antioxidants topically?

    Somewhat related- I seem to recall that vitamin C stays in the skin days after it is applied( despite its biological half life seem to be ~ 30 min in blood plasma)- does this mean topical application of vitamin C, for the purpose of skincare, is better than oral intake?

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