Is Lumixyl Revitaleyes the Ultimate Cure for Dark Circles?: Lumixyl Revitaleyes, Lumixyl Eye Cream Review

Way back in December, the folks at Envy Medical sent me a sample of Lumixyl Revitaleyes ($65.00 retail, EnvyMedical.com).  At first, I was skeptical:  although a 2009 study in The Journal of Drugs in Dermatology reported statistically significant data that Lumixyl is effective in treating melasma (a darkening of the skin typically exhibited during pregnancy or hormone replacement therapy), the eye area is different.  Some dark circles are created by hyperpigmentation, others by excess blood pooling, and a third rare category by a deep tear trough.

However, I was really excited to learn that Lumixyl Revitaleyes will treat dark circles caused by hyperpigmentation and blood pooling – one of the first undereye treatments on the market to do so!

Dark Circles Caused by Blood Pooling

If you apply pressure to the circle or shadow under your eye and it disappears, your problem is due to blood pooling under the eyes.  Lumixyl Revitaleyes contains a combination of the ingredients palmitoyl pentapeptide-7, chrysin, N-hydroxysuccinimide and EDTA.  Together, these ingredients make up the compound Haloxyl®.

In numerous studies, Haloxyl® has been found to facilitate the release of two substances found in blood, bilirubin and iron, which in turn makes the undereye area look lighter and less inflamed (Formulating, Packaging, and Marketing of Natural Cosmetic Products, 2009).   And if it sounds familiar, it’s for good reason:  Haloxyl® is also found in Good Skin Eyliplex-2 ($22.85, Amazon.com) and Maybelline Age Rewind Instant Under Eye Eraser ($7.84, Amazon.com).

Dark Circles Caused by a Deep Tear Trough

If you apply pressure to the circle or shadow under your eye and the shadow forms at the inside corner of your eye, where a tear would flow, it’s probably due to a deep tear trough.  This is not treatable by topical cream application, and I recommend that you see a dermatologist or plastic surgeon for advice.

Dark Circles Caused by Hyperpigmentation

If you apply pressure to the circle or shadow under your eye and the color doesn’t disappear, the darkness is caused by excess pigment.  Lumixyl Revitaleyes contains 0.1% w/v decapeptide-12, which has been found in a Stanford University-based study to reduce hyperpigmentation by inhibiting the enzyme tyrosinase, in a mechanism similar to hydroquinone (The Journal of Drugs in Dermatology, 2009).  

How to Use Lumixyl Revitaleyes for Best Results

I personally have found great results using Lumixyl Revitaleyes both day and night, and applying a combination of retinol and vitamin K over top of it during the night only.

For the record, 0.15% retinol and vitamin K in combination have been found to erase dark circles in 93% of patients over six weeks (Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology, 2004).  Noting 0.15% retinol is quite strong for undereye use, I use Neutrogena Healthy Skin Night Cream with about 0.025% retinol and Peter Thomas Roth Power K Eye Cream with vitamin K over top of Lumixyl Revitaleyes.  Still not as much retinol as was used in the study, but enough to be effective (in my experience).

Given the retinol-compatible pH and light consistency of Lumixyl Revitaleyes, I find it to be really effective when used in conjunction with retinol and vitamin K in fighting hyperpigmentation-caused dark circles.  It is also effective on its own, though it takes longer to see results.

Bottom Line

Lumixyl Revitaleyes actually works on dark circles, provided that your undereye circles are caused by hyperpigmentation and/or blood pooling and not a deep tear trough.  At any rate, I tend to get dark circles from hyperpigmentation when I don’t get much sleep, and I’ve found the combination of Lumixyl RevitaleyesNeutrogena Healthy Skin Night Cream and Peter Thomas Roth Power K Eye Cream to be a real life-saver!  And, again, Lumixyl Revitaleyes also works well on its own – just takes a little longer to see the results.  I love the product as a go-to recommendation for friends who have dark circles from excess pigment and blood pooling – it’s fights both causes!

Like this product?  Let me know your thoughts in Comments below!

Product Rating:  9/10  (High or optimized concentration of proven ingredients:  3/3.  Unique formulation or new technology:  3/3.  Value:  3/3.  Sunscreen: 0/1).

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3 thoughts on “Is Lumixyl Revitaleyes the Ultimate Cure for Dark Circles?: Lumixyl Revitaleyes, Lumixyl Eye Cream Review

  1. semara says:

    Great Article!! Love the tips on helping readers determine what is the source of dark circles. Never knew there were different causes.

  2. Jessica says:

    In canada we have something from Neostrata called anti dark circle complex, it contains 2% haloxyl and 5% retinol along with 2% Achromaxyl (not sure what this ingredient is).
    I am wondering if these concentrations of haloxyl and retinol would be effective?

  3. futurederm says:

    @Semara – Thank you!

    @Jessica – Should be effective, though this is a very high concentration of retinol, particularly for around the eyes. Unless it is 2% haloxyl and 0.5% retinol? If that’s the case, that should be fine.

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