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Product Review: Artistry Creme LuXury Eye

Artistry Creme LuXury Eye With their new eye cream Aristry Crème LuXury Eye ($124, amazon.com), Amway introduces a product with their most expensive and rarest ingredient: cardiolipin. This ingredient is three times the price of gold and Amways has made the most of the idea of luxury by packaging their cream in a gorgeous silver bottle. This eye cream has plenty of ingredients that are new, so when Amway sent it over and I had the opportunity to try it, I had to know just how well their eye cream would work. I found that, though many of the ingredients aren’t well enough studied just yet, it looks like a very promising product.

Cardiolipin

Cardiolipin Cardiolipin is the most expensive and rare ingredient that Amway has ever put into a product. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Cardiolipin is a phospholipid produced naturally in the mitochondria of the cell. It plays a role in cell metabolism by creating a stable environment for certain enzymes and enzyme complexes that are a part of energy production (Cellular and Molecular Life Science). As we age, cardiolipid accumulates more poly-unsaturated fatty acids that weaken it against oxidative damage. Researchers have found that cardiolipin content in the mitochondria decreases with age (Textbook of Skin Aging). Scientists have found that products that increase levels of cardiolipin actually help cells restore youthful function (Anti-Aging and Life Extension Medicine). So does cardiolipin work when applied topically? At a price three times that of gold making the price of cardiolipin-containing creams steep, it’s important that have efficacy. Part of the reason it costs so much is that it’s only produced synthetically in small batches for medical and pharmaceutical research. A clinical experiment using the cream found that 93% of users had smoother skin, 88% experienced a “youthful glow,” and 84% had a “radiant complexion” (Formulations and Science). Many of the studies focus on how upping cardiolipin can cause skin to look younger, without necessarily focusing on whether topical application is the most effective way to do that (FASEB).

Alfalfa Seed Extract

Alfalfa CDC Alfalfa has estrogenic effects that could make it a wrinkle-reducing ingredient. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Artistry uses alfalfa seed extract with the claim that it smoothes and firms skin. It’s been found to be a good antioxidant — with a relatively high amount of polyphenols compounds, it’s a good free-radical scavenger (Plant Biology). But it’s been shown to have other benefits as well. In a test of the cell-proliferation of legume extracts, alfalfa seed extract was found to have some of the highest levels of cell-proliferation, higher than estradiol. It also has estrogenic effects, though it was found to be lower than other legumes in the study (Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry). In topical application, something with estrogenic effects could cause a darkening of the skin called melasma. But studies of estrogen topically applied have shown that it can expedite wound healing in both men and women (American Journal of Clinical Dermatology). Estradiol was found to stop the thinning of aging skin and in the above mentioned study alfalfa was shown to have even better cell proliferation abilities (Clinical Intervention in Aging).

Roxisomes

Roxisomes are another promising new ingredient in skin care. They’re a mitochondrial DNA repair enzyme that’s been shown to activate in the presence of reactive oxygen species (Nucleic Acids Research). These essentially repair the damage done by oxidative stress (Cosmetic Surgery Times). They’ve also been shown to increase collagen and decrease MMP-1, which causes collagen degeneration (American Academy of Dermatology). However, we still don’t know exactly how effective they are without more research. They’re very promising, but before we get behind them, we’ll need more data.

Caffeine

Caffeine Caffeine constricts blood vessels to make them less apparent temporarily. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Caffeine is a vasoconstrictor, which means it can combat the effects of vasodilatation, which can make eyes appear puffy and dark (though dark circles could be cause by a number of other factors). It also dehydrates cells, which can make them look smoother temporarily and has been shown to have some antioxidant properties. And a study with mice showed that topical application of it has a sunscreen-like effect, inhibiting UVB-induced cell carcinogenesis and strengthen UVB induced apoptosis (Carcinogenesis).

Personal Use and Opinion

Artistry Crème LuXury Eye definitely made my tired eyes look more vibrant and awake, almost immediately. The creamy formula was thick and luxurious (as the name would suggest) and absorbed pretty quickly, so it could be layered under other products. It had a lightly floral scent. I’ll admit, I like good packaging and Artistry’s product has that. Aside from the obvious — the silver bottle is elegant looking — it’s also practical. An airtight pump keeps the cream from being exposed and the bottle is actually colored so that the cream won’t degrade in light.

Bottom Line

Artistry Creme LuXury EyeIs Artistry Crème LuXury Eye worth it? It’s definitely one to consider if you’re the kind of person who likes to try new and promising ingredients. There are a lot of new ingredients that have a lot of potential, but not very well studied. None of the ingredients are particularly risky to try, there’s just not the science to back their efficacy. However, if you like trying to latest thing, this eye cream could be for you. And if the price tag concerns you, the company has a satisfaction guarantee of 180 days, so you can give it a try. I definitely saw results immediately upon usage (likely thanks to the caffeine) and early results seem to suggest that over time, these ingredients could help firm and thicken skin. Product Rating: 9/10

  • High or optimized concentration of ingredients: 3/3
  • Unique formulation or new technology: 3/3
  • Value for the money: 3/3
  • Sunscreen: 0/1

  Ingredients Water/Aqua/Eau, Glycerin, Butyrospermum Parkii Shea) Butter, Isostearyl Palmitate, Butylene Glycol, Glyceryl Stearate, PEG00 Stearate, Caprylic/Capric Triglyceride, Petrolatum, Squalane, HDI/Trimethylol Hexyllactone Crosspolymer, Dimethicone, Cetyl Alcohol, Polymethyl Methacrylate, Sorbitan Stearate, Triethylhexanoin, Saccharomyces/Xylinum/Black Tea Ferment, Behenyl Alcohol, C10-30 Cholesterol/Lanosterol Esters, Arginine, Cyclopentasiloxane, Carbomer, Chlorphenesin, Methylparaben, Spinacia Oleracea (Spinach) Leaf Extract, Allantoin, Polysilicone-11, Lecithin, Arginine/Lysine Polypeptide, Disodium EDTA, Panthenol, Tetrahexyldecyl Ascorbate, Dipotassium Glycyrrhizate, Stearyl Glycyrrhetinate, Pullulan, Silica, Carnosine, Isohexadecane, Sodium Hyaluronate, Laminaria Digitata Extract, Hydrolyzed Lupine Protein, Hydrolyzed Soy Protein, Hydroxyethylcellulose, Ammonium Polyacryloyldimethyl Taurate, Avena Sativa (Oat) Kernel Extract, Medicago Sativa (Alfalfa) Seed Extract, Algae Extract, Tocopheryl Acetate, Chlorella Vulgaris Extract, Polysorbate 80, Xanthan Gum, Glycine Soja (Soybean) Oil, Polysorbate 20, Sericin, Oenothera Biennis (Evening Primrose) Seed Extract, Ceramide 3, Limnanthes Alba (Meadowfoam) Seed Oil, Prunus Yedoensis Leaf Extract, Beta-Sitosterol, Perilla Ocymoides Seed Oil, Oenothera Biennis (Evening Primrose) Oil, Caffeine, Centella Asiatica Extract, Helianthus Annuus (Sunflower) Seed Oil, Rosmarinus Officinalis (Rosemary) Leaf Extract, Alpinia Speciosa Leaf Extract, Carrageenan, Disodium Bis-Dioleoyl Glycerophosphoglycerin, Methyl Dihydroxybenzoate, Zea Mays (Corn) Oil, Arabidopsis Thaliana Extract, Sesamum Indicum (Sesame) Seed Oil, Macadamia Integrifolia Seed Oil, Olea Europaea (Olive) Fruit Oil, Micrococcus Lysate, Dipeptide-4, Hexapeptide-9.  

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Date: September 1 2012 at 11:19 AM

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