What’s Wrong With the “No-Poo” Movement: Get the Science

FutureDerm Labs- video about the science of beauty

We made a video demonstrating how baking soda and apple cider vinegar (aka the “no-poo” method) are NOT good for your hair, despite what everyone and their brother/sister are saying on Pinterest. Check it out!

by Lesley Carlin

4 thoughts on “What’s Wrong With the “No-Poo” Movement: Get the Science

  1. Angie Marshick says:

    I am Black and I have went on forums about how to have healthier hair. There is a “Pre-Poo” method recommended which “prepares” your hair for shampooing, by putting a bunch of oil on it, THEN washing it. There is also advice about NOT using shampoo with sulfates in it . African-American textured hair,esp. relaxed hair is very fragile. It breaks about as fast as it grows,which is why a lot of black women don’t have a hard time growing our hair long (er) and why we often resort to weaves, extensions and braids. If anyone could recommend a sulfate-free shampoo, this information would be very useful.

    • Olla says:

      As an African American woman with a lot of natural hair, I would say try sulfate-free shampoos if you’re worried about sulfates. You can find these in most health food stores and natural shops. Try local, small brands and don’t shampoo a lot (I rinse through my hair and vigorously massage my scalp more often than I shampoo.) A nice pre-shampoo is coconut oil.

      I’d also say stop perming if that is something that you’re doing. Most conventional/mainstream hair care products and perms made for “our hair” actually do nothing but destroy it. African women’s hair is a big business not run by people with our hair. There’s no money in a cure, only in keeping people coming back with empty promises.

      If you want the straight look, go to a Dominican hair care shop– they will dry your hair straight will big dryers and rollers which is healthier for your hair than just using a straightening comb or hot iron. You can decide after that if you want them to straighten it more after that. I usually don’t and I also haven’t straightened my hair in 3 years.

      But, overall, I’d say stay away from the mainstream hair care industry. African/African-American hair grows just as long as anybody else’s. The problem is the regime African-American women are using on their hair.

  2. Olla says:

    As an African American woman with a lot of natural hair, I would say try sulfate-free shampoos if you’re worried about sulfates. You can find these in most health food stores and natural shops. Try local, small brands and don’t shampoo a lot (I rinse through my hair and vigorously massage my scalp more often than I shampoo.) A nice pre-shampoo is coconut oil.

    I’d also say stop perming if that is something that you’re doing. Most conventional/mainstream hair care products and perms made for “our hair” actually do nothing but destroy it. African women’s hair is a big business not run by people with our hair. There’s no money in a cure, only in keeping people coming back with empty promises.

    If you want the straight look, go to a Dominican hair care shop– they will dry your hair straight will big dryers and rollers which is healthier for your hair than just using a straightening comb or hot iron. You can decide after that if you want them to straighten it more after that. I usually don’t and I also haven’t straightened my hair in 3 years.

    But, overall, I’d say stay away from the mainstream hair care industry. African/African-American hair grows just as long as anybody else’s. The problem is the regime African-American women are using on their hair.

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