Glycation: How Sugar Ages Your Skin (FutureDerm Video)

FutureDerm Labs- video about the science of beauty

If you eat a diet high in sugar, it could affect your skin. Nicki explains it all in our video on glycation.

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2 thoughts on “Glycation: How Sugar Ages Your Skin (FutureDerm Video)

  1. Brenna says:

    Is there a way to use vitamin c and other antioxidants on the whole body to protect that skin as well? Is that unnecessary?

  2. Nicki Zevola says:

    Hi @Brenna,

    That’s a tricky question.

    The vast majority of signs of aging is attributable to photoaging, i.e., excess sun exposure. Vitamin C as L-ascorbic acid in concentrations of at least 15% in combination with vitamin E at 2% has been shown in numerous studies to boost UVA/UVB protection by as much as 400%. For this reason, for areas that are exposed to the sun regularly, use of vitamin C and vitamin E in these concentrations or higher is recommended to prevent further signs of photoaging.

    Glycation is another beast. You’re probably looking at 10% or less of the total signs of aging that are attributable to excess sugar rather than excess sun, but it’s a fair amount. Glycation is contributing to loose, hanging skin, the parts of the body that don’t “spring back” when impacted.

    The #1 thing you can do to prevent signs of aging on the body is to keep your weight as stable as possible. By that same token, the #1 thing you can do to prevent glycation on the body is to consume only as many calories as you need from nutrient-dense foods that are ranked low on the glycemic index. You don’t want peaks and valleys in your blood sugar levels. Keep it nice and steady — and low.

    So does applying antioxidants topically to the body hurt anything? Absolutely not. Vitamin C, for one, is lightening and brightening and even a bit (just a tiny bit) tightening as it stimulates collagen production. But I want to be honest, the greatest effects for your body’s skin as far as glycation goes stem from what you are feeding it — and what you are not feeding it — internally.

    Hope this helps,
    Nicki

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