Butylated Hydroxytoluene

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Butylated Hydroxytoluene (Wikipedia)
Butylated hydroxytoluene
Skeletal formula of butylated hydroxytoluene
Ball-and-stick model of the butylated hydroxytoluene molecule
Names
IUPAC name
2,6-Bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)-4-methylphenol
Other names
2,6-Di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol
2,6-Di-tert-butyl-p-cresol (DBPC)
3,5-Di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxytoluene
BHT
E321
AO-29
Avox BHT
Additin RC 7110
Dibutylated hydroxytoluene
4-Methyl-2,6-di-tert-butyl phenol
Identifiers
128-37-0 YesY
ChEBI CHEBI:34247 YesY
ChEMBL ChEMBL146 YesY
ChemSpider 13835296 YesY
EC Number 204-881-4
Jmol 3D image Interactive graph
KEGG D02413 YesY
RTECS number GO7875000
UNII 1P9D0Z171K YesY
Properties
C15H24O
Molar mass 220.36 g·mol−1
Appearance White to yellow powder
Odor slight, phenolic
Density 1.048 g/cm3
Melting point 70 °C (158 °F; 343 K)
Boiling point 265 °C (509 °F; 538 K)
1.1 mg/L (20 °C)
Vapor pressure 0.01 mmHg (20°C)
Hazards
Main hazards Flammable
Safety data sheet External MSDS
R-phrases R22-R36-R37-R38
S-phrases S26-S36
NFPA 704
Flammability code 1: Must be pre-heated before ignition can occur. Flash point over 93 °C (200 °F). E.g., canola oilHealth code 2: Intense or continued but not chronic exposure could cause temporary incapacitation or possible residual injury. E.g., chloroformReactivity code 0: Normally stable, even under fire exposure conditions, and is not reactive with water. E.g., liquid nitrogenSpecial hazards (white): no codeNFPA 704 four-colored diamond
Flash point 127 °C (261 °F; 400 K)
US health exposure limits (NIOSH):
PEL (Permissible)
none
REL (Recommended)
TWA 10 mg/m3
IDLH (Immediate danger)
N.D.
Related compounds
Related compounds
Butylated hydroxyanisole
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), also known as dibutylhydroxytoluene, is a lipophilic organic compound, chemically a derivative of phenol, that is useful for its antioxidant properties. European and U.S. regulations allow small amounts to be used as a food additive. In addition to this use, BHT is widely used to prevent oxidation in fluids (e.g. fuel, oil) and other materials where free radicals must be controlled.

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