Cerium Oxide

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Cerium Oxide (Wikipedia)
Cerium(IV) oxide
Cerium(IV) oxide
Ceria-3D-ionic.png
Names
IUPAC name
Cerium(IV) oxide
Other names
Ceric oxide,
Ceria,
Cerium dioxide
Identifiers
1306-38-3 YesY
12014-56-1 (monohydrate) N
ChEBI CHEBI:79089 N
ChemSpider 8395107 YesY
Jmol 3D image Interactive graph
PubChem 73963
UNII 619G5K328Y N
Properties
CeO2
Molar mass 172.115 g/mol
Appearance white or pale yellow solid,
slightly hygroscopic
Density 7.215 g/cm3
Melting point 2,400 °C (4,350 °F; 2,670 K)
Boiling point 3,500 °C (6,330 °F; 3,770 K)
insoluble
Structure
cubic (fluorite)
Hazards
NFPA 704
Flammability code 0: Will not burn. E.g., waterHealth code 1: Exposure would cause irritation but only minor residual injury. E.g., turpentineReactivity code 0: Normally stable, even under fire exposure conditions, and is not reactive with water. E.g., liquid nitrogenSpecial hazards (white): no codeNFPA 704 four-colored diamond
Related compounds
Related compounds
Cerium(III) oxide
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
N verify (what is YesYN ?)
Infobox references

Cerium(IV) oxide, also known as ceric oxide, ceria, cerium oxide or cerium dioxide, is an oxide of the rare earth metal cerium. It is a pale yellow-white powder with the chemical formula CeO2.

Cerium(IV) oxide is formed by the calcination of cerium oxalate or cerium hydroxide.

Powdered ceria is slightly hygroscopic and will also absorb a small amount of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

Cerium also forms cerium(III) oxide, Ce
2
O
3
, which is an unstable compound that will oxidize to cerium (IV) oxide under standard conditions for temperature and pressure.

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