Dimethicone

« Back to Glossary Index

A type of silicone that works well to help fill in wrinkles, while still allowing other ingredients to get through to the skin thanks to its unique structure. Often used in foundation to prevent the product from creasing in lines and wrinkles.

Dimethicone (Wikipedia)
Polydimethylsiloxane
PDMS
PDMS
Names
IUPAC name
poly(dimethylsiloxane)
Other names
PDMS
dimethicone
dimethylpolysiloxane
E900
Identifiers
63148-62-9 YesY
UNII 92RU3N3Y1O YesY
Properties
(C2H6OSi)n
Density 965 kg m−3
Melting point N/A (vitrifies)
Boiling point N/A (vitrifies)
Pharmacology
P03AX05 (WHO)
Hazards
NFPA 704
Flammability code 1: Must be pre-heated before ignition can occur. Flash point over 93 °C (200 °F). E.g., canola oilHealth code 2: Intense or continued but not chronic exposure could cause temporary incapacitation or possible residual injury. E.g., chloroformReactivity code 0: Normally stable, even under fire exposure conditions, and is not reactive with water. E.g., liquid nitrogenSpecial hazards (white): no codeNFPA 704 four-colored diamond
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
N verify (what is YesYN ?)
Infobox references

Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) belongs to a group of polymeric organosilicon compounds that are commonly referred to as silicones. PDMS is the most widely used silicon-based organic polymer, and is particularly known for its unusual rheological (or flow) properties. PDMS is optically clear, and, in general, inert, non-toxic, and non-flammable. It is also called dimethicone and is one of several types of silicone oil (polymerized siloxane). Its applications range from contact lenses and medical devices to elastomers; it is also present in shampoos (as dimethicone makes hair shiny and slippery), food (antifoaming agent), caulking, lubricants, kinetic sand, and heat-resistant tiles.

« Back to Glossary Index