Placenta

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Extracted from the organ that connects a baby to its mother in her uterus, this ingredient has not been shown to have any positive effect on the skin. It is usually taken from sheep, pigs, or goats, but at least one product we know of uses human placenta.

Placenta (Wikipedia)
For the ancient Roman Bread, see placenta (food). For the placenta of fruit, see placentation.
Placenta
Placenta.svg
Placenta
Human placenta baby side.jpg
Human placenta from just after birth with the umbilical cord in place
Details
Precursor decidua basalis, chorion frondosum
Identifiers
Latin Placento
Code TE E5.11.3.1.1.0.5
Anatomical terminology

The placenta (also known as afterbirth) is an organ that connects the developing fetus to the uterine wall to allow nutrient uptake, provide thermo-regulation to the fetus, waste elimination, and gas exchange via the mother's blood supply, fight against internal infection and produce hormones to support pregnancy. The placenta provides oxygen and nutrients to growing babies and removes waste products from the baby's blood. The placenta attaches to the wall of the uterus, and the baby's umbilical cord develops from the placenta. The umbilical cord is what connects the mother and the baby. Placentas are a defining characteristic of placental mammals, but are also found in some non-mammals with varying levels of development. The homology of such structures in various viviparous organisms is debatable and, in invertebrates such as Arthropoda, is analogous at best.

The word placenta comes from the Latin word for cake, from Greek πλακόεντα/πλακοῦντα plakóenta/plakoúnta, accusative of πλακόεις/πλακούς plakóeis/plakoús, "flat, slab-like", in reference to its round, flat appearance in humans. The classical plural is placentae, but the form placentas is common in modern English and probably has the wider currency at present.

Prototherial (egg-laying) and metatherial (marsupial) mammals produce a choriovitelline placenta that, while connected to the uterine wall, provides nutrients mainly derived from the egg sac.

The placenta functions as a fetomaternal organ with two components: the fetal placenta (Chorion frondosum), which develops from the same blastocyst that forms the fetus, and the maternal placenta (Decidua basalis), which develops from the maternal uterine tissue.

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