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9 thoughts on “What’s Wrong With the “No-Poo” Movement: Get the Science

  1. Angie Marshick says:

    I am Black and I have went on forums about how to have healthier hair. There is a “Pre-Poo” method recommended which “prepares” your hair for shampooing, by putting a bunch of oil on it, THEN washing it. There is also advice about NOT using shampoo with sulfates in it . African-American textured hair,esp. relaxed hair is very fragile. It breaks about as fast as it grows,which is why a lot of black women don’t have a hard time growing our hair long (er) and why we often resort to weaves, extensions and braids. If anyone could recommend a sulfate-free shampoo, this information would be very useful.

    • Olla says:

      As an African American woman with a lot of natural hair, I would say try sulfate-free shampoos if you’re worried about sulfates. You can find these in most health food stores and natural shops. Try local, small brands and don’t shampoo a lot (I rinse through my hair and vigorously massage my scalp more often than I shampoo.) A nice pre-shampoo is coconut oil.

      I’d also say stop perming if that is something that you’re doing. Most conventional/mainstream hair care products and perms made for “our hair” actually do nothing but destroy it. African women’s hair is a big business not run by people with our hair. There’s no money in a cure, only in keeping people coming back with empty promises.

      If you want the straight look, go to a Dominican hair care shop– they will dry your hair straight will big dryers and rollers which is healthier for your hair than just using a straightening comb or hot iron. You can decide after that if you want them to straighten it more after that. I usually don’t and I also haven’t straightened my hair in 3 years.

      But, overall, I’d say stay away from the mainstream hair care industry. African/African-American hair grows just as long as anybody else’s. The problem is the regime African-American women are using on their hair.

  2. Olla says:

    As an African American woman with a lot of natural hair, I would say try sulfate-free shampoos if you’re worried about sulfates. You can find these in most health food stores and natural shops. Try local, small brands and don’t shampoo a lot (I rinse through my hair and vigorously massage my scalp more often than I shampoo.) A nice pre-shampoo is coconut oil.

    I’d also say stop perming if that is something that you’re doing. Most conventional/mainstream hair care products and perms made for “our hair” actually do nothing but destroy it. African women’s hair is a big business not run by people with our hair. There’s no money in a cure, only in keeping people coming back with empty promises.

    If you want the straight look, go to a Dominican hair care shop– they will dry your hair straight will big dryers and rollers which is healthier for your hair than just using a straightening comb or hot iron. You can decide after that if you want them to straighten it more after that. I usually don’t and I also haven’t straightened my hair in 3 years.

    But, overall, I’d say stay away from the mainstream hair care industry. African/African-American hair grows just as long as anybody else’s. The problem is the regime African-American women are using on their hair.

  3. Lisa says:

    The “no-poo method” does not typically use baking soda and vinegar. In its original and more usual form, its practitioners use conditioner to cleanse the hair and scalp. I don’t know who started using baking soda and vinegar, but I suspect it was someone who hadn’t taken a general chemistry class! Using a conditioner to cleanse, on the other hand, are very beneficial to those of us with coarse, curly hair in an arid environment.

  4. Kj says:

    I for one, have been using the No Poo Method for a few months and haven’t noticed any significant problems, or any problems in general with my hair. In fact my hair is much shiner than it was and I don’t have to wash my hair as often, only about 2 times a week. I bleached part of my hair right before I started the No Poo Method, and my hair is looking pretty healthy. I have also noticed that I don’t have as many split ends as well.

  5. Sarah says:

    Uh carbon dioxide (CO2) is what we as human beings breath out. What is so wrong about releasing that into our hair and the environment…. Right after she explained how releasing CO2 into the environment is “not good” she mixes baking soda and vinegar together, releasing CO2 into the air. Please explain to me how any of this makes sense…

  6. bonnie says:

    I am Caucasian and of European descent. I have very fine, very curly hair. The no-poo method I use involves pretreating my hair with either almond or jojoba oil at least half an hour (or more) before washing it. I then wet my hair down and start adding a sulfate-free, silicone-free *conditioner*. I usually use the Dollar Store brand in the 32 fl . oz. pump bottle, which costs $2. I work this well through my hair and scalp. The conditioner contains enough surfactants to clean the hair. I wrap my hair in a microfiber towel and do not rub the hair, as to not disturb the cuticle. While hair is still quite damp I rub a couple of drops of the oil on my palms and then a quarter size of mousse together, and then, starting at the ends of my hair, work it in towards the roots, keeping the product away from my scalp as much as possible. I let the hair dry naturally, than fluff it out from the roots with my head tipped over, trying to leave the top undisturbed as much as possible.

    I usually cleanse my hair twice a week using this method. In between, I dampen my hair with water and fluff it out as if I had just cleansed it after it is dry. If it gets a little fuzzy on top, I add a little mousse to smoothe out the frizzies.
    Curly hair is typically very dry hair. The only thing that may get oily is the scalp.
    I have found the almond oil very healing for my scalp psoriasis. If it breaks out between cleansings, I will put a little on a qtip and apply to the area.
    I only use all sulfate and silicone free products.

  7. bonnie says:

    Please note from my previous comment: the type of conditioner I have recommended here combines with the oil I have added in the pretreatment to break it down. The surfactants in the conditioner are enough to cleanse your hair and scalp. If you truly have naturally curly (dry) hair, this will not leave your hair oily, but will leave it soft and shiny.

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